All the wind blows this way...
adonisarchive:

Ali Gordon

adonisarchive:

Ali Gordon

victormosquera:

Something I’ve been painting on my free time! super inspired by Dan McPharlin. 

victormosquera:

Something I’ve been painting on my free time! super inspired by Dan McPharlin. 

deletingmyself:

polar bear (by floridapfe)| Yongin, South Korea
Twitter | Facebook

deletingmyself:

polar bear (by floridapfe)| Yongin, South Korea

Twitter | Facebook

distant-traveller:

Caterpillar comet poses for pictures en route to Mars

Comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring wriggles between the globular clusters NGC 362 (upper left) and 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) while skirting the edge of the Small Magellanic Cloud

Image credit: Rolando Ligustri

distant-traveller:

Caterpillar comet poses for pictures en route to Mars

Comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring wriggles between the globular clusters NGC 362 (upper left) and 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) while skirting the edge of the Small Magellanic Cloud

Image credit: Rolando Ligustri

naturepunk:

lionsilverwolf:

naturepunk:

naturepunk:

So I cracked three eggs, and every one of them had double yolks. Is that some kind of record? 

I found a giant egg in the nest box today so I cracked it open and it had three yolks in it and I’m just so done with chickens right now. 



Your chickens are nuts.


I apparently need to buy a lottery ticket because reportedly, the chances of getting one double-yolked egg are 1 in 1,000, and the chances of getting one triple-yolk egg are at 1 in one billion. 

naturepunk:

lionsilverwolf:

naturepunk:

naturepunk:

So I cracked three eggs, and every one of them had double yolks. Is that some kind of record? 

I found a giant egg in the nest box today so I cracked it open and it had three yolks in it and I’m just so done with chickens right now. 

Your chickens are nuts.

I apparently need to buy a lottery ticket because reportedly, the chances of getting one double-yolked egg are 1 in 1,000, and the chances of getting one triple-yolk egg are at 1 in one billion. 

corruptionpoints:

Tonight’s Game: Exalted - Abyssals!

corruptionpoints:

Tonight’s Game: Exalted - Abyssals!

intellectualequilibrium:

untitled by chiu*k on Flickr.
i-doll:

2106; day six viii | banff → jasper, via icefields parkway

i-doll:

2106; day six viii | banff → jasper, via icefields parkway

danielodowd:

Stranger in a strange land
distant-traveller:

Spiral in Serpens

This new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a beautiful spiral galaxy known as PGC 54493, located in the constellation of Serpens (The Serpent). This galaxy is part of a galaxy cluster that has been studied by astronomers exploring an intriguing phenomenon known as weak gravitational lensing.
This effect, caused by the uneven distribution of matter (including dark matter) throughout the Universe, has been explored via surveys such as the Hubble Medium Deep Survey. Dark matter is one of the great mysteries in cosmology. It behaves very differently from ordinary matter as it does not emit or absorb light or other forms of electromagnetic energy — hence the term “dark”.
Even though we cannot observe dark matter directly, we know it exists. One prominent piece of evidence for the existence of this mysterious matter is known as the “galaxy rotation problem”. Galaxies rotate at such speeds and in such a way that ordinary matter alone — the stuff we see — would not be able to hold them together. The amount of mass that is “missing” visibly is dark matter, which is thought to make up some 27% of the total contents of the Universe, with dark energy and normal matter making up the rest. PGC 55493 has been studied in connection with an effect known as cosmic shearing. This is a weak gravitational lensing effect that creates tiny distortions in images of distant galaxies.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

distant-traveller:

Spiral in Serpens

This new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a beautiful spiral galaxy known as PGC 54493, located in the constellation of Serpens (The Serpent). This galaxy is part of a galaxy cluster that has been studied by astronomers exploring an intriguing phenomenon known as weak gravitational lensing.

This effect, caused by the uneven distribution of matter (including dark matter) throughout the Universe, has been explored via surveys such as the Hubble Medium Deep Survey. Dark matter is one of the great mysteries in cosmology. It behaves very differently from ordinary matter as it does not emit or absorb light or other forms of electromagnetic energy — hence the term “dark”.

Even though we cannot observe dark matter directly, we know it exists. One prominent piece of evidence for the existence of this mysterious matter is known as the “galaxy rotation problem”. Galaxies rotate at such speeds and in such a way that ordinary matter alone — the stuff we see — would not be able to hold them together. The amount of mass that is “missing” visibly is dark matter, which is thought to make up some 27% of the total contents of the Universe, with dark energy and normal matter making up the rest. PGC 55493 has been studied in connection with an effect known as cosmic shearing. This is a weak gravitational lensing effect that creates tiny distortions in images of distant galaxies.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

intothegreatunknown:

Grinnell Lake | Glacier National Park, Montana, USA (by still.not.making.sense.)

intothegreatunknown:

Grinnell Lake | Glacier National Park, Montana, USA (by still.not.making.sense.)

warlock subclass → sunsinger
           【 radiance appreciation 】

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